A Polish Granny Finds Ancient Rare Artifact – Keeps It For 50 Years as an “Unusual Looking Stone”

A Polish Grandmother made a significant discover over 50 years ago and didn’t even know it.

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According to Artnet News, a very interesting discovery was made by a polish Grandmother over 50 years ago, but is just now coming to light.

According to the report, one day the woman stumbled upon an “unusual looking” stone in a field near her home. And just like many collectors of strange and unique rocks would do, she kept it. Then, about a half-century later, she passed the “unusual looking stone” down to her grandson. And it’s he who decided to have it looked at by a professional.

Side-A: Flint axe-head from around 2500 B.C.E. discovered by grandmother in Poland. (image: Lublin Provincial Conservator of Monuments)

The woman originally discovered the unassuming looking object in the vicinity of Biłgoraj, Poland and it remained in her possession until it was passed down to her grandson, Mariusz Buczko.

After receiving the stone, Buczko took it to a local area museum to have it assessed by a professional. The stone axe-head was authenticated and confirmed as a significant prehistoric artifact by Jerzy Libera, a scholar affiliated with the University of Maria Curie-Skłodowska. Libera categorized the artifact as a flint axe-head from the Neolithic era, dating back roughly 4,400 years. Libera also believed that the people credited with making the stone axe-head are people of the Globular Amphora culture.

Side-B: Flint axe-head from around 2500 B.C.E. discovered by grandmother in Poland. (image: Lublin Provincial Conservator of Monuments)
Flint axe-head from around 2500 B.C.E. discovered by grandmother in Poland. (image: Lublin Provincial Conservator of Monuments)

Key Characteristics of the Flint Axe:

  • Shape: Trapezoidal
  • Length: Approximately 4.3 inches
  • Blade: Slightly serrated
  • Surface: Appears smooth
  • Coloring: Gray-brown with varying shades

Another resident from Biłgoraj contributed a second archaeological find—a fragmented hatchet believed to be from the same time period, although less information could be extracted due to its incomplete state.

These two finds provide invaluable insight into the Globular Amphora culture. The discovery of these two artifacts pushes the boundaries of their previously known habitation, indicating that their influence might have spanned a much larger geographical area, extending through eastern Poland and neighboring Ukraine.

Biłgoraj, the discovery site of these artifacts, stands roughly 150 miles southeast of Warsaw, near the border with Ukraine.

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